Ida Foster

Ida Foster

Ida Foster has a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in Psychology from Concordia University, and is presently enrolled as a second-year Ph.D student in the School/Applied Child Psychology Program at McGill University. Ida completed her Master’s Thesis in 2015, which focused on the effects of interviewer gender on the veracity of children’s eye-witness testimonies. She is thrilled to be working in Dr. Victoria Talwar’s lab, and is looking forward to starting her dissertation research on children’s lie-telling behaviours.

 

Awards

  • 2013-2014 SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, $17500/12 months
  • 2014-2015 FRQSC Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture B1 scholarship, $15000/12 months
  • 2015-2019 SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship, $20 000/year

Conferences

  • Foster, I., Wyman, J., Tong, D., & Talwar, V. (2016, March). The effects of children’s age, gender, and interviewer gender on children’s disclosures of a theft. Symposium presentation presented at the 2016 Annual Conference of the American Psychology-Law Society, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Foster, I., Wyman, J., & Talwar, V. (2014, March). The effects of interviewer gender on promoting truthfulness in children. Poster presented at the 2014 Annual Conference of the American Psychology-Law Society, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • Foster, I., Wyman, J., & Talwar, V. (2014, March). Does interviewer gender influence truthfulness in children? Poster presented at the Education Graduate Students’ Society (EGSS) Annual Conference, Montréal, Québec.
  • Foster, I., Wyman, J., Talwar, V., & Taieb-Lachance, C. (2014, May). The developmental patterns of lie-telling-behaviour and lie-maintenance in children. Symposium presentation presented at the Development 2014: A Canadian Conference on Developmental Psychology, Ottawa, Ontario.
  • Foster, I., Wyman, J., Taieb-Lachance, C., Talwar, V., & Crossman, A. (2015, March). The roles of executive functions and theory-of-mind on children’s abilities to maintain a false accusation. Paper presented at the 2015 Annual Conference of the American Psychology-Law Society, San Diego, California.

 

 


 

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